Niche healthcare providers expected to emerge triumphant as healthcare landscape shifts

Health Tech News

A new report from PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health Research Institute indicates that savvy new companies will shake up the healthcare industry as it shifts towards a technology-enabled, consumer-facing model.

Vaughn Kaufmann, the principle at PwC’s Health Industries has been quoted as saying, “Soon, healthcare will have its own Amazon.com-style, iconic, new economy brands.”

While many companies are competing for a piece of the 3 trillion dollar industry, Kaufmann predicts that those companies that are better serving specific niches will be among those that emerge triumphant.

For Open Source Health, this report confirms CEO Sonya Satveit’s strong conviction that a platform dedicated to women’s health, and more specifically to women’s hormone health,  is exactly what is needed as we move into the new healthcare landscape.

Read more: Savvy new players expected to shake up healthcare
Full Report: PricewaterhouseCooper’s new health economy 

 

7 in 10 U.S. adults track a health indicator like weight or chronic symptoms. One in five “health-trackers” use technology to keep tabs on their health status.

7 in 10 U.S. adults track a health indicator like weight or chronic symptoms. One in five “health-trackers” use technology to keep tabs on their health status.

Industry News

Tracking can affect someone’s overall approach to health

Why do people go to the trouble of tracking health data, for themselves or for someone they care for? A recent study conducted by The Pew Internet & American Life Project says it’s because people get results. Of the U.S. adults that track health indicators, using memory, paper, technology or a combination:

  •  46% say that this activity has changed their overall approach to maintaining their health or the health of someone for whom they provide care.
  • 40% say it has led them to ask a doctor new questions or to get a second opinion from another doctor.
  • 34% of trackers say it has affected a decision about how to treat an illness or condition.

In all, 63% of trackers agree with at least one of those statements of impact.

Tracking has had a more significant impact on people living with chronic conditions

The same study concluded that of  “health trackers” living with 2+ conditions:

  • 56% say it has affected their overall approach to maintaining their health or the health of someone they help care for, compared with 40% of trackers who report no chronic conditions.
  • 53% say it has led them to ask a doctor new questions or to seek a second opinion, compared with 33% of trackers with no chronic conditions
  • 45% say it has affected a decision about how to treat an illness or condition, compared with 25% of trackers with no chronic conditions.

Open Source Health is committed to offering Women the tools they need to take an active role in their health. With open source technology and innovative in-lab and at-home blood testing, Open Source Health offers patients the ability to enjoy a personal health profile with all diagnostic and graphed data showing changes to their hormonal health over time. This means women can test, track and share their health data with whom ever they choose, while enjoying dramatically reduced blood test wait times & costs.

Source:

The results reported come from a nationwide survey of adults living in the United States. To download the full report “Tracking for Health, visit: the Pew Research Internet Project.

Mobile health continues to climb in popularity, especially among smartphone owners

Mobile health continues to climb in popularity, especially among smartphone owners

Industry News

Over half of cell phone owners in the U.S. say that they own a smartphone. This translates to 45% of all American adults. Recent research conducted by The Pew Internet & American Life Project indicates that 52% of smartphone owners have looked up health information on their phone. Youth, those with a higher level of education, a higher-income and those that own a smartphone are all more likely to use their cell phone to look for health information. Each of these observations holds true under statistical analysis isolating each factor.

In other words, it is not simply that smartphone owners are likely to be younger than other American adults and both groups are likely to use their phones to look up health information. Each characteristic has an independent effect on mobile health information consumption.

Source:

The results reported come from a nationwide survey of adults living in the United States. To download the full report “Mobile Health 2012, visit: the Pew Research Internet Project.